American Dust

A random blog that features things like soccer, politics, personal financial advise, and sometimes comics.

Media Bias

  I just found this over at http://www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/openingargument.php

Some interesting things about how the press has purposefully misquoted or edited Palin comments, then presented them to the public as fact.  And that supposedly unbias interview with Charlie Gibson is one of the worst cases.  Here’s the highlights:

* In Sarah Palin’s first big media interview, on September 11, Charlie Gibson of ABC News asked: “You said recently, in your old church, ‘Our national leaders are sending U.S. soldiers on a task that is from God.’ Are we fighting a holy war?” Palin responded: “You know, I don’t know if that was my exact quote.” Gibson pressed: “Exact words.”

Viewers had no way of knowing that, in fact, Gibson was distorting Palin’s meaning by leaving out critical context and thus making an unremarkable exhortation to prayer sound like a declaration of holy war. Palin had not said that the war was a task from God. She had urged her listeners to “pray” that it was a task from God. A September 3 Associated Press report by Gene Johnson distorted Palin’s meaning in exactly the same way.

* A front-page story in the September 12 Washington Post, by Anne Kornblut, was headlined: “Palin Links Iraq to Sept. 11 in Talk to Troops in Alaska.” This was misleading, as were the first two paragraphs. They implied that Palin had advanced the long-discredited “idea that the Iraqi government under Saddam Hussein helped Al Qaeda plan the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.” In fact, Palin’s reasonably clear meaning was not that Saddam had a role in the 9/11 attacks but that (as the article backhandedly acknowledged) the troops would be fighting Al Qaeda in Iraq, which is related to the group that launched the 9/11 attacks.

* The New York Times did a huge (3,120-word) front-page story on February 21 implying that McCain had had a sexual affair with a female lobbyist while doing her political favors. But the article lacked strong evidence either that there had been a sexual affair or that McCain had crossed legal or ethical lines to do favors. Would The Times have printed the same story had the senator been Barack Obama or John Kerry? I doubt it.

* The Times also rushed to assert, in a front-page story on September 2 questioning how carefully McCain vetted Palin’s background, that she “was a member for two years in the 1990s of the Alaska Independence Party, which has at times sought a vote on whether the state should secede.” This turned out to be erroneous. (Her husband had previously been a member.)

This is not to deny that McCain deserves much of the criticism he has received for his distortions about Obama. But not all of it. Take the ad on which the most-bitter media complaints–“blizzard of lies” and the like–have focused. It asserts that Obama’s “one accomplishment” in the area of education was “legislation to teach ‘comprehensive sex education’ to kindergarteners.”

But the bill was not Obama’s (he was not a sponsor), was not an accomplishment (it never passed), and would not have been his “only” accomplishment even if it had passed. More important, it called for extending only “age appropriate” sex ed from sixth grade down to kindergarten. There is no reason to doubt Obama’s explanation that he wanted kindergartners to be taught only the dangers of inappropriate touching.

But a Times editorial overstated the case in saying that “the kindergarten ad flat-out lies” and that “at most, kindergartners were to be taught the dangers of sexual predators.” In fact, whatever Obama’s intention, the bill itself was designed “to mandate that issues like contraception and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases be included in sex-education classes for children below sixth grade, and as early as kindergarten,” as Byron York demonstrates in a detailed National Review Online article.

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